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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10445/8704

Title: Speakerhood as Segregation: The Construction and Consequence of Divisive Discourse in TESOL
Authors: Rivers, Damian
Abstract: This chapter revisits the issue of status drawn from categorization as either a native-speaker teacher of English or as a non-native-speaker teacher of English in TESOL. It remains that despite various discussions being heard (see Aneja, 2016a/b; Aslan and Thompson, 2016; Cook, 2016; Ellis, 2016; Faez, 2011; Swan et al., 2015), nothing seems to change. Language teachers, researchers and academics appear content with performing discursive routines which produce outcomes so predictable that it is as if those discussions never actually took place (see Kandiah, 1998). Our profession persists in orienting itself toward upholding the division of teaching professionals primarily upon status criteria derived from the idea of the native speaker as the authentic language user and proprietor. Discontent with the current situation, the circular discourse it encourages and the endless stimulation of guilt and shame it provokes, this chapter outlines how individuals on both sides of the fracture attain status privilege and suffer status marginalization through the strategic positioning of their fabricated counterpart. It suggests that the dynamics responsible follow a pendulum-like motion whereby for one group to attain a higher status (privilege) the other group must, as a consequence, be portrayed in a manner that inflicts upon them a lower status (marginalization).
Research Achievement Classification: 著書/Book
Type: Book
Peer Review: あり/yes
Solo/Joint Author(s): 単著/solo
Spage: 195
Epage: 215
Date: Apr-2018
Publisher: Springer
Appears in Collections:Damian Rivers

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